Month: July 2016

SQL Server 2016 is Generally Available

This post was authored by Joseph Sirosh, Corporate Vice President, Data Group, Microsoft.   A new platform for intelligent applications The integration of advanced analytics into a transactional database is revolutionary. Today a majority of advanced analytic applications use a primitive approach of moving data from databases into the application tier to derive intelligence. This approach incurs high latency because of data movement, doesn’t scale as data volumes grow and burdens the application tier with the task of managing and maintaining analytical models. And deep analytics on real-time transactions are next to impossible without a lot of heavy lifting. SQL Server 2016 simplifies analytics in the way databases simplified enterprise data management, by moving analytics close to where the data is managed instead of the other way around. It introduces a new paradigm where all joins, aggregations and machine learning are performed securely within the database itself without moving the data out, thereby enabling analytics on real-time transactions with great speed and parallelism. As a result, analytical applications can now be far simpler and need only query the database for analytic results. Updating machine learning models, deploying new models, and monitoring their performance can now be done in the database without recompiling and redeploying applications. Furthermore, the database can serve as a central server for the enterprise’s analytical models and multiple intelligent applications can leverage the same models. It...

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C# BAD PRACTICES: Learn how to make a good code by bad example – Part 1

By Radosław Sadowski How to code properly Introduction My name is Radoslaw Sadowski and I’m a Microsoft Certified Software Developer. Since beginning of my career I was working with Microsoft technologies. After a few years of experience I saw so many badly written code that I could write a book showing all these dirty examples.Those experiences made me a clean code freak. A purpose of this article is to show how to write a clean, extendable and maintainable code by showing example of badly written class. I will explain what troubles could it bring and present a way how to replace it by a better solution – using good practices and design patterns. First part is for every developer who knows C# language basics – it will show some basic mistakes and techniques how to make code readable like a book. Advanced part is for developers who have at least basic understanding of design patterns – it will show completely clean, unit testable code. To understand this article you need to have at least basic knowledge of: C# language dependency injection, factory method and strategy design patterns Example described in this article is a concrete, real world feature – I won’t show examples like build pizza using decorator pattern or implement calculator using strategy pattern As those theoretical examples are very good for explanation I found extremely difficult to...

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High-performance finite elements with C#

Igor Gribanov Performing linear static analysis on a tetrahedral mesh with a little bit of help from a third-party solver. Introduction Open-source finite element (FE) codes are usually written in C++ and come as large libraries with thick user manuals. It is not surprising, because FE computations are complex and require high performance. Managed code was not intended to compete in performance with C, so languages like C# would be unlikely candidates for scientific computation. But is this the case with finite elements? FE formulations exist for various models in thermodynamics, electromagnetism, continuum mechanics and other areas of physics. Most often they assemble and solve a linear system of equations K~u~=f~ , either once or multiple times. This step is the most computationally expensive, since the matrix K~ is usually quite large. Solving a linear system is an algorithmic problem, which has little to do with finite elements, so this takes is usually delegated to a separate algorithm. Therefore, the Finite Element code itself can be written in C#, making use of the managed collections and LINQ query operations with minimal memory fragmentation. This article describes an implementation of an established technique in solid mechanics – linear static analysis. When external loads are applied to a deformable object, they create internal stresses and strains in the material, resulting in reaction forces and in deformation of the object. Static analysis...

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This startup may have built the world’s fastest networking switch chip

By Stephen Lawson   Networking has undergone radical changes in the past few years, and two startup launches this week show the revolution isn’t over yet. Barefoot Networks is making what it calls a fully programmable switch platform. It came out of stealth mode on Tuesday, the same day 128 Technology emerged claiming a new approach to routing. Both say they’re rethinking principles that haven’t changed since the 1990s. Now is a good time to shake up networking, because IT itself is changing shape, says Nemertes Research analyst John Burke. “Everybody pretty much wants and needs their IT services to work continuously and scalably,” Burke said. Enterprises need shorter communication delays, a way to scale networks up or down without months of preparation, and a distributed architecture to prevent breakdowns from one hardware failure. It’s happening because many enterprise applications just can’t stop working without dire consequences. “We’ve so dramatically ramped up our level of dependency on these services to do business that these things follow in the wake of that dependency,” he said. SDN (software-defined networking) is intended in part to meet those needs. Now some new players are going further. Barefoot spent two years developing the Tofino series of switch chips that it calls the world’s fastest, at 6.5Tbps (bits per second). Even more important is Barefoot’s PISA (Protocol Independent Switch Architecture), which gives networking vendors near-total...

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What Is an Industrial Arts (Technical Education) Degree?

by Lee Grayson, studioD Industrial arts study, promoted by progressive education reformers beginning in the 1900s, trained students at all education levels from elementary through college to learn the practical skills necessary for work and business. The field focused on employment trends, and early students completed hands-on training in carpentry, metal work, ceramics and leather crafting. Modern industrial arts study, now frequently called career and technical education, offers students degrees in many of the same traditional fields, but also expands the degree options into include two and four-year study of technology and applied arts. Hands-on Instruction Industrial arts degrees teach students using hands-on instruction. The most effective programs train with the same equipment and technology used by professionals in the workplace so students practice and perfect the techniques required by the job. Employment fields, including construction trades, frequently don’t require a formal degree for hiring, but an industrial arts degree shows employers that program graduates have the required training and skills to move directly onto the job site for work. A degree also proves to potential employers that graduates have the commitment to the field and the motivation to complete a demanding study program. Technical Degrees Technical and vocational degrees offered by industrial arts programs include criminal justice, information systems, industrial technology and management, computer science, engineering, graphic arts and healthcare management and administration. Art schools and some two...

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